Making a Quality Job Application

Be Transparent

When making a job application you want to make sure your CV is up to date and includes all the relevant information.

When writing your CV it is important to bear in mind that withholding information or not being transparent about your skills could cause problems with your application further down the line and possibly ruin relationships for yourself, the recruiter and their client and run the risk of a job offer being withdrawn.

For tips on how to write your CV and make sure it stands out see our article on “8 Ways to make your CV Stand Out”.

Be Selective

When you begin your search really think about what role you are looking for.

Are there particular sectors you want to avoid?

Are there certain tasks you know you do not want to do?

Do you want a role that offers progression?

Do you want to work for a small or large company?

What are your salary expectations?

If you know what you are looking for then you can avoid wasting time applying for roles that are not quite right for you.  Take the time to read the content of the role so that you can really understand what is going to be expected of you, if there is something you are unsure of then call up the employer or agency to find out more about what the role will entail.

Only apply for roles that are within your skill set and experience level, there is no point in making a job application for a role that you are under qualified for or have no relevant experience of.

Be Realistic with you Salary Expectations

Be realistic with you salary expectations – of course there is nothing wrong with aiming high but be realistic.

Roles are often advertised with a salary range, if you have previous experience in all the tasks/responsibilities listed on the advert then you may be looking at the higher range of the salary however if your experience is limited or not quite up to date then you may have to compromise on your expectations.

When making a job application if you are unsure about what to expect with your experience then speak to the recruiter or HR department and discuss where you would sit within the range.

Build a Relationship with your Recruiter or HR Department

Once you have applied for the relevant roles if your CV is successfully shortlisted by the recruiter or HR Department hiring the position they will try to get in contact to find out a bit more about yourself and why you are interested in the position.

If you are not available at the time to talk then ensure you call them back as soon as you can, alternatively if they email asking you to call and you are not available email back saying you are interested and arrange a time to call so they know you are keen and aren’t left waiting.  Similarly if you have found another job or decided that actually the role is not for you let them know! – You may need their assistance in the future, so always try and build positive relationships.

When the recruiter or HR Department call this is their first impression of you.  Ensure your voicemail is up to date – you don’t want to sound unprofessional (see our article on Social Media and Tech Tips for advice!).

When you do speak to them express how keen you are on the job and ask any relevant questions, it may be once you have asked some questions you are no longer interested – be honest if this is the case, there is no point in wasting theirs or your own time.  When the recruiter or HR department calls be prepared in case they ask you for an interview – if you don’t know your availability arrange a time to call them back with dates and times and ensure you get back to them within the arranged time frame.

Screening Questions

Once you have carefully read through the job advert and you decide that you would like to make a job application there may well be screening questions attached to the advert.  If the role requires a minimum number of years’ experience then the screening question may ask if you have this experience – be honest if you don’t have the experience don’t say you do!

It may sound obvious but so many candidates say they have 5 years’ experience but when you read through the applicants CV they only have 3-4 years.

Be honest it may be that not having the experience is not a dealer breaker but by stating you have the experience and not being quite truthful it may put off the recruiter or HR Department hiring.  If the company or client requires 5 years’ experience it will mean that there will be some complex tasks that require this level of experience, if you apply for the role but only have 1-2 years’ experience then chances are you will not be suited for the role.

For Interview preparation tips see tomorrows article on “Preparation for Interview” or follow on Facebook and Twitter.

If you need further assistance or have any questions on this article please feel free to contact us on 01252 734848 or email us at info@highpointrec.co.uk.

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